30 Day Geek Out Challenge – Day 28

From the sweeping, epic horns that accompany the Fellowship’s travels, to the mysterious and elegant chorus that mimics the elves in Lothlorien, I could sit and just listen to all three hours and 40 minutes of Shore’s pieces.

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Megan over at A Geeky Gal blog created this challenge for fellow geeks to share all about what makes them nerdy. You can see her completed challenge post here.

Favorite movie soundtrack?

Movie soundtracks can be a lot of things, from collections of popular songs to classical masterpieces. Each have their own merits, but as a former violinist, it’s the classical tracks that really speak to me.

It’s interesting, if you think about it; classical music really only exists anymore in movie soundtracks. Composers who hope to have their work heard on a broader scale almost certainly have to go into movie scoring.

Movie scores have to add that extra life to a movie, setting the mood for scenes that might otherwise be difficult to interpret. Many composers set the background for a movie beautifully, but listening to the soundtrack on it’s own may get tedious.

Every now and again a composer will come along and craft something that perfectly suits a movie, and is also a pure musical masterpiece on its own.

Howard Shore’s Lord of the Rings soundtracks (for all three movies in the main trilogy), are such masterpieces.

From the sweeping, epic horns that accompany the Fellowship’s travels, to the mysterious and elegant chorus that mimics the elves in Lothlorien, I could sit and just listen to all three hours and 40 minutes of Shore’s pieces.

There’s so much to unpack with this music.

I once saw Howard Shore himself conduct the Cleveland Orchestra performing selections from the score of Lord of the Rings. It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience that not many things come close to. The sheer number of performers needed to execute the live production – a full symphony orchestra, an extensive percussion ensemble, a choir, a children’s choir, soloists – Shore was aiming for the stars when he wrote this music.

While I love the more grandiose pieces in the score, it was the more gentle, quiet ones that had the most emotional impact.

“Aníron”, which is a song featured on the track “The Council of Elrond” on the soundtrack to The Fellowship of the Ring, just takes your breath away with Enya’s ethereal vocals.

Here’s a seven minute loop of Aníron – you’re welcome.

“Evenstar”, from The Two Towers, captures the devastatingly sad moments between Arwen and Aragorn, with their seemingly hopeless love story. I still tear up when I hear this song, no matter how many times I’ve heard it now.

“Evenstar” by Howard Shore, performed by Isabel Bayrakdarian

The soundtrack is special to me on so many levels.

My wedding theme was Lord of the Rings (which I also talk about on Day 5) so of course we had music from the soundtrack at the wedding. I arranged with my DJ to have the triumphant music from “The Return of the King” play during the wedding party procession.

Notice the leaf brooch/necklace? Yeah, we went all out.

“Aniron” played when it was my turn to walk down the isle – after all, who doesn’t want to feel like a majestic elven princess on their wedding day?

Then, “Evenstar” played during our vows, which involved a handfasting ceremony.

I love this music so much, and it really made my wedding day extra special. I felt like I was in Middle Earth for a day.

Wedding or no, Howard Shore’s music really does transport me to Middle Earth. Whenever I want to escape to Rivendell or the Misty Mountains, I put on this soundtrack.

Now, I am passing the love on to my kids. “May it Be” and “Into the West” are two favorite bed time songs because of their sweet, peaceful melodies. My son regularly asks for this song, and can even sing some of the elvish chorus in May it Be.

You’d better believe I’m a proud nerd mama to have my three year old singing in elvish!


Tell me about your favorite movie soundtrack in the comments!

2 comments on “30 Day Geek Out Challenge – Day 28”

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